Sugar free strawberry ice-cream

Posted on July 31, 2009. Filed under: Diabetes/diabetic recipe, ice-cream | Tags: , , , |

Relish this delicious ice-cream when fresh strawberries are in season. This rich, creamy, ice-cream is made with reduced milk, thickened with cornflour and sweetened with a sugar substitute. You will need to add less sugar substitute if the fruit you use is ripe and sweet. Taste the ice-cream mixture after you add and mix each sachet to ascertain how much you need to add.
Fresh Lychees or kala jamun can also be used as an alternative to strawberries.

Cooking Time : 10 mins.
Preparation Time : 20 mins.

Serves 4.

Ingredients

2 tablespoons cornflour

2 1/2 cups (1/2 litre) low fat milk

1 cup fresh strawberries, chopped
3 to 4 sachets sugar substitute
Method
1. Mix the cornflour in ½ cup of cold milk and keep aside.
2. Bring the remaining milk to a boil in a non-stick pan and add the cornflour mixture.
3. Stir continuously and simmer over a slow flame till it coats the back of a spoon.
4. Cool completely. Add the sugar substitute and the strawberries and pour into an air-tight container.
5. Freeze for 4 to 6 hours.
6. Liquidise in a blender till it is slushy and pour back into the air-tight container. Freeze till the ice-cream is set.
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Diabetic caramel custard

Posted on July 31, 2009. Filed under: Diabetes/diabetic recipe | Tags: , , |

A light and tasty pudding not only for diabetics but for all those who are health conscious and want to avoid sugar laden desserts.
The low fat milk used in this recipe has a wealth of nutrients like protein and calcium which is extremely essential for the maintenance of healthy bones.
I have used one teaspoon of sugar to make the caramel, but you can avoid it and simply enjoy the custard.

Cooking Time : 15 mins.
Preparation Time : 60 mins.

Serves 4.

Ingredients

1 tablespoon custard powder

2 1/2 cups low fat milk

3 sachets sugar substitute
½ teaspoon vanilla essence
5 grams China grass (agar agar), cut into small pieces
1 teaspoon sugar for caramelising
Method
1. Soak the China grass in ¾ cup of cold water for 15 to 20 minutes. Put to cook on a slow flame until it dissolves. Keep warm.
2. In a pudding mould, add the sugar (for caramelising) and 1 teaspoon of water and continue cooking until the sugar becomes brown.
3. Spread the caramelised sugar all over the base of the mould, rotating the mould to spread it evenly. The sugar will harden quickly.
4. Mix the custard powder in ½ cup of cold milk.
5. Boil the remaining milk. When it comes to a boil, add the custard powder and milk mixture and continue cooking till you get a smooth sauce.
6. Add the China grass solution to the custard and boil again for 2 minutes.
7. Strain the mixture and cool it slightly. (Strain the mixture if it is lumpy).
8. Add the vanilla essence and sugar substitute and mix well. Pour this mixture over the prepared pudding mould. Allow to set in a refrigerator.
9. Before serving, loosen the sides with a sharp knife and invert on a plate.
10. Serve chilled.
Tips
The mould should be approx. 125 mm. (5″) in diameter to get a 50 mm. (2″) high custard.
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Common myths about diabetes

Posted on July 31, 2009. Filed under: Diabetes/diabetic recipe | Tags: , |

Myth : Diabetes cannot be prevented…

Fact : Diabetes can be prevented, if you do not have a family history of it. Its onset can also be delayed in individuals who have a family history of diabetes and are predisposed to this condition. For example, a WHO report says that if both parents are diabetic there is 99% chance of the child being diabetic, 70% if one parent is diabetic and the other is from a diabetic family, 40% if only one parent is diabetic and only 20% if anyone in the family is diabetic.
Eating regular meals, exercising regularly, refraining from cigarettes and alcohol and keeping stress away are all good measures that can help to keep diabetes away.
Myth : Excessive consumption of sweets can cause diabetes….
Fact : Consumption of sugar or sweets is not directly responsible for the onset of diabetes. It is the body’s inability to produce insulin that causes diabetes. When the cells cannot utilize the sugar or starch we eat, our blood sugar levels rise rapidly causing diabetes or even aggravating already existing diabetes.
However, excessive consumption of sweets can also lead to weight gain and such a weight gain along with sedentary habits, stress and/or a family history of diabetes can increase the risk of its occurrence.
Myth : Diabetes is curable…
Fact : There is no real cure for diabetes and it is a life long condition that can be managed through diet control, exercise and medication under the supervision of your physician.
However, if you are a borderline diabetic, with proper care you can keep your blood sugar levels under control without the use of any medication.
Myth : Diabetics should not eat fruits….
Fact : It is a false notion that diabetics should not have fruits. One can consume fibre-rich fruits like sweet lime, oranges, guavas, amla, etc and fruits that are high in water fruits like watermelon, musk melon, strawberries, papaya, plums, etc. as these help to control blood sugar levels. Due to their low glycemic index, they promote a gradual increase in the blood sugar levels which is beneficial to diabetics. Fresh fruits like oranges, sweet lime, apples also contribute substantially in providing vitamins and minerals to our diet.
On the other hand, restrict all fruit juices because they contain too much sugar and because plenty of fruit is required to make 1 glass of juice. Juice will also not add any fibre to your diet as most of it is are strained thus raising the blood sugar levels instantaneously. Fruits like mango, chickoo, custard apple, banana and grapes should also be restricted as they have a high sugar content. Refer to the food exchange list to see how much quantity of a particular fruit is allowed.
Myth : Diabetics cannot eat rice …..
Fact : That’s not completely true. The caloric value of rice is very close to other cereals like wheat and jowar but rice has a tendency to increase the blood sugar levels very quickly. Therefore rice should always be combined with some other food, preferably vegetables or dals, as they have a high fibre content which prevents a rapid rise in blood sugar (sugar) levels. Brown rice or unpolished rice is a better choice as compared to white polished rice as they have more fibre.
Myth : Diabetics can never eat sweets or desserts….
Fact : That’s not true. Diabetics can enjoy an occasional treat like a pastry or ice cream but the key is to have it in moderation and also in accordance with the food exchange list. If you indulge in dessert, try and compensate for that treat with other foods in the same meal. For example, if you know you want to eat dessert, then skip either the appetizer or the rice dish.
If you’re having dessert try and share it with someone so that you’re not obliged to finish the whole portion. Choose a fruit based dessert over a cream based one.
Try the low calorie desserts that we have made with low fat products and artificial sweeteners and satiate your sweet tooth.
Myth : Artificial sweeteners have no side effects…
Fact : Artificial sweeteners are safe for everyone except pregnant or breast feeding women. Artificial sweeteners like saccharine and aspartame are almost free of calories and carbohydrates and so do not raise the blood sugar levels like sugar does. Some sweeteners can cause mild reactions like dizziness, headaches, gas or diarrhoea.
Adding it in the right quantity is also vital because if you have added too much sweetener, then there is a predominant bitter after taste.
Myth : Sugar free products are safe to consume…
Fact : No, this may not apply to every product. Some products that are labeled “sugar free” may be high in fat and hence are not very healthy for diabetics. So it is a good practice to read the nutrition facts on the package before buying any food. Look for sugar free and fat free on the labels.
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Exercise for diabetics

Posted on July 31, 2009. Filed under: Diabetes/diabetic recipe | Tags: , |

Physical activity for a diabetic person is very important. It should be an integral part of your lifestyle. One should try and maintain a moderate and regular exercise regime throughout one’s life.

Exercise can help you to burn the excess fat in your body and can thus help you lose excessive weight. Regular exercise also helps to regulate the blood sugar levels and to improve the action of insulin. Exercise also improves the heart’s efficiency to pump blood.

It is important for diabetics to remember to eat a carbohydrate rich snack like 2 low fat biscuits or a small khakhra before you begin exercising. This is to avoid hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels) and should be done in case you are exercising on an empty stomach.

To avoid complications, do consult your physician or diabetologist before starting any exercise to confirm your medical fitness. He will also help you choose a form of exercise that is suitable for your activity levels, age and general health.

Today, the urban lifestyle does not allow us to exercise during the day. We have become dependent on transportation and technology like elevators, escalators, taxis, cars, and buses. Even at work, most of us have sedentary lifestyles and we do not even walk a couple of minutes each day. All these factors coupled with stress and unhealthy eating aggravate the problem and encourage obesity that is the root cause for many urban diseases.

Exercising regularly also decreases our stress levels and makes us happier healthier individuals. It is wisest to choose a form of exercise comfortable to your lifestyle, for example swimming, brisk walking, aerobics, and yoga. Alternatively, indulge in a game you enjoy like tennis, badminton etc.

Brisk walking is the best form of exercise as it helps to reduce the cholesterol levels in the blood. Most doctors recommend a regular brisk walk for at least 20 to 30 minutes daily.

Exercise raises the High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) levels, which is also called good cholesterol and decreases the bad cholesterol also known as Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) levels.
High HDL (good cholesterol) levels help the body to remove cholesterol deposits, thus preventing heart disease.

If you do not find the time to set aside for exercising include it in some form during the day. Take the stairs instead of using the elevator, walk short distances instead of taking a cab; take a small walk after lunch or dinner, or pick up your groceries instead of having them delivered, as this works out your arms too.

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Home remedies for diabetics

Posted on July 31, 2009. Filed under: Diabetes/diabetic recipe | Tags: , , |

“Nature cure is the best ” is what all of us believe. Yes, nature has blessed us with some dietary adjuncts to control diabetes too. Listed below are a few of them.

Source

Form

Frequency to consume

Effect

Bitter gourd (Karela) Juice with seeds or cooked vegetable. Should be consumed daily on empty stomach or in between meals. The high insulin dose of this plant helps to reduce blood and urinary sugar levels.
Amla A tablespoon of amla juice with a cup of karela juice is helpful. Daily. Try at least for 2 months for effective results. This mixture helps to reduce the blood sugar in diabetics because of its low glycemic index.
Fenugreek (methi) Fenugreek leaves and seeds. In case of seeds soak one teaspoon of seeds overnight. Half a cup of leaves should be consumed daily. Alternatively one teaspoon of seeds twice a day with milk are also helpful. This is considered to be an effective supportive therapy for the management of diabetes.
Spirulina Leaves or dried powder Half a cup of leaves should be consumed daily. As these leaves are not easily available, half teaspoon of dried powder can be taken every day. The soluble fibre in it stabilizes the blood sugar and cholesterol levels.
Neem and Basil leaves Leaves or dried powder A few neem and basil leaves everyday. In case you can’t find fresh leaves half teaspoon of dried powder can be taken every day. Lowers blood sugar levels.
Onion Raw Daily Has diuretic and digestive property and also helps to maintain blood sugar levels.
Garlic Fresh (crushed) Daily Helps to control blood sugar levels
Black Jamun Fruit or seed powder. An equal quantity of jamun powder, amla powder and karela powder is useful. Consume 3 to 4 pieces of jamun fruits or a teaspoonful of mixture once or twice a day. Contains jamboline which helps to control the blood sugar levels.
Soyabean Whole beans or sprouts or soya milk or soya flour. Half cup of beans or a quarter cup of sprouts or half cup of flour. Rich in choline which is effective in controlling diabetes and also helps in preventing neurological complications of diabetes.
Chana Dal Whole or extract of sprouted dal Half a cup daily Utilizes glucose in the body and reduces the intake of insulin.
Low fat curds and buttermilk One to two cups daily Lactic acid present in these fermented products stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin and hence helps to control blood sugar levels.
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Alcohol and diabetes

Posted on July 31, 2009. Filed under: Diabetes/diabetic recipe | Tags: , |

Alcohol is becoming an important part of our lifestyles and is sadly considered acceptable on most social occasions such as weddings, social gatherings and as part of our work culture too. Going a beer after work seems to be becoming a normal thing to do.

Alcohol provides approximately 7 kcal per gram, unfortunately these are empty calories and get deposited as fat reserves in our body. This means that it only provides calories without any nutrients and thus leads to weight gain.

If you must have alcohol here are a few pointers to keep in mind.
Avoid cocktails as they are usually made with calorie laden sweet mixers like juices, cream and aerated beverages. Use a calorie free drink mixer like soda, tonic water or water. Refer to the table of Common Alcoholic Combinations, see below, to discover the difference yourself.
Since alcohol has a tendency to lower blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia), restricting its intake is remarkably important for diabetics, as one can become hypoglycemic. If you wish to have an occasional drink, never do so on an empty stomach.
Have a low fat and carbohydrate rich snack, to keep you going. Alternatively have your drink with a light meal or a snack, avoiding deep fried foods and calorie-laden munchies. Try Hummus, or Baked Tortilla Chips…with Tomato Salsa instead.
Drink only when and if the blood sugar levels are in control. Even if it is a special occasion, avoid alcohol on such days. Do not plan to drive for several hours after you have had a drink.
If you drink more than occasionally ask your nutritionist to work it in your diet plan so that it does the minimum harm to your body. Also he/she will recommend the kind of alcohol that you should have. For example 1 alcoholic beverage equals to 12- oz of beer, 5-oz glass of wine or 1 1/2 oz of distilled spirits like whiskey, gin etc. 1 serving of alcohol is equal to 2 fat servings on the food exchange list.

Caloric Value of Alcoholic Beverages

Alcoholic Beverage

Amount

Calories

Beer 12 oz (approx. 330 ml) 178
Wine 60 ml 63
Port Wine 60 ml 95
Gin (1 peg) 30 ml 73
Rum (1 peg) 30 ml 73
Whisky (1 peg) 30 ml 73
Vodka (1 peg) 30 ml 73
Brandy 30 ml 77

Common Alcoholic Combinations

Alcoholic Beverage

Amount

Calories

Wine + Soda (Spritzer) 30 ml + 100 ml 34
Gin + Lemonade 30 ml + 220 ml 169
Gin + Tonic water 30 ml + 220 ml 73
Rum + Coke 30 ml + 220 ml 169
Rum + Water 30 ml + 220 ml 73
Whisky + Coke 30 ml+220 ml 169
Whisky + Soda 30 ml + 220 ml 79
Vodka + Orange Juice 30 ml+ 220 ml 284
Vodka + Tonic water 30 ml + 220 ml 73
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Precautions for dining out for diabetics

Posted on July 31, 2009. Filed under: Diabetes/diabetic recipe | Tags: , |

These rigorous restrictions are probably easy to live with if you’re eating at home. But eating out either at a restaurant or with company can lead to an uncomfortable situation, especially if you have to ask the hostess to prepare a special meal for you. Sometimes, we tend to cut down on our socializing to avoid the embarrassment.
If you know that you will be dining out, prepare for it in advance.
If dinner is going to be served late, have soup or a small snack along with your medication before you start out. The trick here is that if you leave for the party on an empty stomach, temptation attacks quicker and we tend to binge on whatever we can lay our hands on first. Whereas if we have snacked a little before the party, we can reason and choose our food wisely.
Do not get tempted or flustered if you happen to see only spicy and oily food around you. Be patient and try to select the best of the lot. Eat small portions and have a snack when you get back home.
In case cocktails are being served, have an unsweetened fresh lime with soda instead of aerated water or an alcoholic beverage.
Choose you appetizer wisely, avoid the fried ones and munch on vegetable crudities or a salad.
If you are not sure of any of the dishes being served, do not hesitate to ask the hostess or your server (in case of restaurants) for the ingredients used in a particular dish.
Choose chapatis or phulkas, instead of naans, as the latter are made of refined flour i.e. maida.
Select a stir-fried or sauteed vegetable dish rather than vegetables with gravy (as gravies may contain fatty ingredients like coconut, cashewnuts and plenty of oil). If you’re eating at a restaurant, ask the server to request the chef to use less oil in your dishes.
Try and avoid plain rice as it has a tendency to increase the blood sugar levels very rapidly. Always select a rice dish with a good combination of vegetables as they contain fibre and hence help to control the blood sugar levels.
Have plenty of salads, but choose the dressings carefully. Always select low fat salad dressings or salads with a hint of lemon juice and other flavouring agents like herbs, pepper, soya sauce etc.
Choose clear soups over creamy ones as thick and creamy soups have oodles of butter and flour that is used to thicken it.
Have plain dals instead of the ‘tadka’ dals which have an unhealthy amount of butter or ghee added to temper and flavour it.
Order grilled, steamed or roasted dishes as compared to deep fried ones.
Enjoy an occasional treat like a pastry or ice cream but remember to have it in moderation and also in accordance with the food exchange list. If you’re having dessert, try and share it with someone so that you’re not obliged to finish the whole portion. Choose a fruit based dessert over a cream based one. If you indulge in dessert, try and compensate for that treat with other foods in the same meal. For example, if you know you want to eat dessert, then skip either the appetizer or the rice dish.
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Foods allowed, restricted and forbidden in diabetes

Posted on July 31, 2009. Filed under: Diabetes/diabetic recipe | Tags: , , , |

Foods Allowed

These are foods with a low glycemic index and hence a large part of your diet should comprise of these foods. Foods with a low glycemic index increase the blood sugar gradually and so are good for diabetics.

Complex cereals like whole wheat, whole wheat noodles, bajra, jowar, ragi, wheat bran, rice bran, barley etc.
Dals and pulses like moong dal, tur dal, rajma, moong etc.
All vegetables like cabbage, brinjal, cluster beans, spinach, methi etc. except those mentioned in the restricted list like potatoes, yam and sweet potatoes.
Low fat dairy products like milk, curds, paneer and buttermilk.
Fruits with low sugar and high water content like watermelon, pineapple etc. Have only one serving of fruit at a time.
Restricted Foods
These are foods with a high glycemic index and they can escalate blood sugar levels faster than foods with a low glycemic index. Indulge in these foods in moderation and only as an occasional treat

Indulge in these foods in moderation and only as an occasional treat.

Sugar rich fruits like chickoo, custard apple, grapes and mango.
Vegetables such as potatoes, yam, purple yam and sweet potato.
Polished rice.
Biscuits such as Digestive and Marie.
Artificial sweeteners.
Restrict the intake of fat to 3 teaspoons per day.
Cheese
Forbidden Foods
These foods are best avoided as they can only cause harm to your health and have little or no nutritive values. These can escalate the blood sugar levels almost instantaneously.
Refined sugar, honey, jaggery, jam and jellies.
Deep fried foods like wafers, samosas, farsan etc.
High fat salad dressings which use cream, mayonnaise etc.
Fruit juices as they rapidly increase the blood sugar levels. Instead, it is better to have a whole fruit as it contains fibre which is beneficial to regulate your blood sugar levels.
Aerated drinks, preserved or canned fruit and fruit squash which contain loads of sugar as preservative.
Alcohol.
Nuts like dried cashewnuts, almonds etc., as they are high in saturated fat.
Sweet meats like peda, barfi and all other mithais.
Chocolates, puddings and pies, full fat ice-creams, biscuits made with refined flour, high sugar and cream content.
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Food exchange list for diabetics

Posted on July 31, 2009. Filed under: Diabetes/diabetic recipe | Tags: , |

I often wondered whether it is possible for a diabetic to follow a rigid meal plan throughout their life without indulging once in a while or succumbing to an occasional Chocolate Brownie…..
Fortunately, that’s possible and the food exchange list will help you to do just that.

As this system allows you to exchange one food with the other on the same list, it is referred as FOOD EXCHANGE LIST.

Every food on a particular list has approximately the same calories, carbohydrates, protein and fat content. One serving (exchange) of each of these foods are equal and can be exchanged for any other food on the same list.

This list provides us with a large variety of food choices that we can substitute our favourite foods with while also controlling the distribution of calories, carbohydrates, protein and fat throughout the day so that the blood sugar levels are balanced.

For example, to be able to enjoy a pastry you can exchange it with approx. ½ exchange of cereal, ½ exchange of low fat milk and 1 exchange of fat.

According to this list, all major food groups are divided into 7 separate categories. Each group consists of a list of foods/ ingredients along with their recommended serving sizes that a diabetic person can indulge in with relative safety

The food exchange list has been divided into 7 major groups as follows:

1. Cereal / Starch
2. Pulses
3. Vegetables
4. Fruits
5. Milk and Dairy Products
6. Fat
7. Meal

Listed below are many of the ingredients most commonly included in the Indian diet along with their recommend serving sizes that can be exchanged with another food in the same group as they have approximately the same nutritive values. If there is any particular food that is not included on this food exchange list, ask your nutritionist for more information.

1. Cereal / Starch
Each item in this list contains approximately 100 calories, 23.5 grams of carbohydrates, 3 grams of protein and a trace of fat. All the foods in this list have been listed alphabetically and each ingredient can be substituted with another ingredient in this list.

Name

Exchange

Bajra (black millet), raw

3 tablespoons

Bajra flour (black millet flour)

1/4 cup

Barley (jau), raw

2½ tablespoons

Broken wheat (dalia), raw

2½ tablespoons

Buckwheat (kutto or kutti no daro), raw

2½ tablespoons

Jowar (white millet), raw

2½ tablespoons

Jowar flour (white millet flour)

1/3 cup

Kodri (varagu), raw

1/2 cup

Makai ka atta (maize flour)

3/4 cup

Plain flour (maida)

1/4 cups

Poha (flaked rice)

1/2 cup

Puffed rice (mumara)

2 cups

Quick rolled oats, raw

1/3 cup

Ragi (nachni) flour

1/4 cup

Rice flour (chawal ka atta)

1/4 cup

Rice, cooked

2/3 cup

Rice, parboiled, raw

2 tablespoons

Semolina (rawa), raw

2½ tablespoons

Wheat flour (gehun ka atta)

1/4 cup

Whole wheat bread

2 slices

Whole wheat pasta, cooked

1 cup

2. Pulses
Each item in this list contains approximately 100 calories, 17 grams of carbohydrate, 7 grams of protein and a trace of fat. All the foods in this list have been listed alphabetically and each ingredient can be substituted with another ingredient in this list.

Name

Exchange

Bengal gram flour (besan)

1/3 cup

Black eyed beans (lobhia), cooked

1/3 cup

Chana dal (split Bengal gram) , cooked

1/3 cup

Chick peas (kabuli chana), cooked

1/3 cup

Masoor (whole red lentil), cooked

1/3 cup

Masoor dal (split red lentil), cooked

1/3 cup

Matki (moath beans), cooked

1/2 cup

Moong (whole green gram), cooked

3/4 cup

Moong dal (split green gram), cooked

1/3 cup

Moong dal flour (green gram flour)

2 tablespoons

Rajma (kidney beans), cooked

2/3 cup

Red chana (whole red gram), cooked

2 tablespoons

Soya chunks, cooked

2/3 cup

Soya flour

1/3 cup

Soya granules, cooked

1/2 cup

Soyabean, cooked

1/3 cup

Toovar (arhar) dal, cooked

1/3 cup

Urad dal (split black gram), cooked

1/3 cup

Vaal (field beans), cooked

2/3 cup

3. Vegetables
Each item in this list contains approximately 25 calories, 5 grams of carbohydrates, 1 gram of protein and a trace of fat. All the foods in this list have been listed alphabetically and each ingredient can be substituted with another ingredient in this list.

Name

Exchange

Asparagus, chopped

1/2 cup

Baby corn

4 Nos

Beetroot, chopped

3/4 cup

Bhindi (ladies fingers), chopped

1 cup

Bottle gourd (lauki/ doodhi), chopped

2 cups

Brinjals (baingan), chopped

1 cup

Broccoli, grated

1 cup

Cabbage, chopped

1 cup

Capsicum, chopped

1 cup

Carrot, chopped

1/3 cup

Cauliflower, grated

1 cup

Celery stalks, chopped

1¼ cup

Cluster beans (gavarfali), chopped

1½ cup

Chawli (cow pea) leaves, chopped

1 cup

Coriander leaves, chopped

2 cups

Cucumber, chopped

1 1/3 cup

Dill (shepu), chopped

3 cups

Drumstick, chopped

1¼ cup

Fenugreek (methi) leaves, chopped

2 cups

French beans, chopped

1 cups

Green peas

1/4 cup

Kand (purple yam), chopped *

1/4 cup

Karela (bitter gourd), sliced

1 cup

Lettuce, chopped

3/4 cup

Mushrooms, chopped

1¼ cup

Onion, chopped

1/3 cup

Papdi beans, chopped

2/3 cup

Potato, chopped *

1/4 cup

Radish (mooli) leaves, chopped

2 cups

Red pumpkin (kaddu), chopped

1 cup

Spinach (palak), chopped

1 cup

Spring onions, chopped

1 cup

Suran (yam), chopped *

1/4 cup

Sweet corn, whole (raw)

3/4 cup

Sweet potato, chopped *

2 tablespoons

Tendli, chopped

1 cup

Tomato, chopped

3/4 cup

Turai (ridge gourd), chopped

2 cups

* Foods to consumed in restricted amounts.
4. Fruits
Each item in this list contains approximately 40 calories, 10 grams of carbohydrate, 1 gram of protein and zero gram of fat. All the foods in this list have been listed alphabetically and each ingredient can be substituted with another ingredient in this list.

Name

Exchange

Apple, chopped

1/2 cup

Banana, chopped *

1/8 cup

Black jamun

7 Nos

Cherry, chopped

1/3 cup

Chickoo, chopped *

1/3 cup

Custard apple *

1/4 cup

Grapes, medium *

1/3 cup

Guava, chopped

1/2 cup

Mango, chopped *

1/3 cup

Muskmelon (kharbooja), chopped

1½ cups

Orange, segmented

1/2 cup

Papaya, chopped

1 cup

Peach, chopped

2/3 cup

Pears, chopped

2/3 cup

Pineapple, chopped

1/2 cup

Plum, sliced

1/2 cup

Pomegranate (anar)

1/2 cup

Strawberries, quartered

3/4 cup

Sweet lime, segmented

1/2 cup

Watermelon (tarbuj), chopped

1½ cups

White jamun

3 Nos

* Foods to be consumed in restricted amounts.
5. Milk
Each item in this list contains approximately 80 calories, 12 grams of carbohydrate, 8 grams of protein and a trace of fat. All the ingredients in this list have been arranged alphabetically and each ingredient can be substituted with another ingredient in this list.

Name

Exchange

Cheese, shredded *

1/4 cup

Low fat milk

1 cup

Low fat curds

1 cup

Low fat paneer, chopped

1/4 cup

* Foods to be consumed in restricted amounts.
6. Fat
Each item in this list contains approximately 45 calories, no carbohydrate, no protein and 5 grams of fat and each ingredient can be substituted with another ingredient in this list.

Name

Exchange

Butter *

1 teaspoon

Oil / Ghee *

1 teaspoon

* Foods to be consumed in restricted amounts.
7. Meat
Lean meat (white meat) contains approximately 55 calories, no carbohydrates, 7 grams of protein and 3 grams of fat whereas high fat meat (red meat) contains approximately 100 calories, no carbohydrates, 7 grams of protein and 8 grams of fat.
You can consult your doctor or nutritionist about meat nutrient values.
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Healthy cooking for diabetics

Posted on July 31, 2009. Filed under: Diabetes/diabetic recipe | Tags: , |

A healthy balanced diet isn’t just about eating the right kind of food. The way that you buy, store, prepare and cook your food, and even the pots, pans and equipment you use, all have a significant impact on the nutritional value of your meals. The aim should be to limit the consumption of oil-laden foods and to incorporate plenty of vegetables, fruits, cereals and pulses in our regular diet.

To limit the consumption of fats in your regular diet, here are some handy tips.

Use non-stick cookware as they require less oil to cook food.

Bake, steam or saute instead of shallow frying or deep frying foods.

Use a pressure cooker to cook vegetables s pressure cooking requires less oil. This method also helps one to conserve the nutrients that are volatile, as the closed lid prevents the loss of nutrients.

Avoid the use of nuts like coconut, cashewnuts etc. Replace the gravies made with cashewnuts or khus khus paste with a vegetable puree like cauliflower or pumpkin puree. Use tomato gravy, as in the recipe of Stuffed Karelas in Makhani Gravy or use pumpkin to thicken a vegetable dish, as in the recipe of Gavar Pumpkin Vegetable

Choose skim milk and its products in place of whole milk. Skim milk provides all the goodness of milk except the fat. Try and use cottage cheese (paneer) made at home using skim milk instead of buying it from the market. Preparing skim milk at home does not demand much effort from your side. Believe me, it is very easy to prepare. All you need to do is boil the milk and skim the fat layer (malai) that is formed after it has cooled. Repeat this procedure at least twice or three times to get almost fat free milk. An easier way to make skim milk is to mix skim milk powder with water to make milk, curds, low fat paneer etc.

Avoid salads with oil-based dressings like mayonnaise. Make innovative low fat dressings made with low fat curds as in the recipe of Lemony Yoghurt Salad on or an oil free soya sauce and lemon dressing as in the recipe of Cucumber Salad

Be aware of hidden fats present in foods like peanuts, sesame seeds, walnuts or cashewnuts, cakes, sweet savouries, cream biscuits, chocolates, popcorn made with butter or oil. Very often, we binge on these calorie-laden foods believing them to be not so fatty as they are not as visible like in fried foods.

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